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Lucky Earth

A random sample of the collection of improbable and mutually exclusive events that led to our emergence here on this rock.

If the Sun formed in a region with less or different gas contribution the Earth would likely have an ammonia Ocean instead of a water one.

If the proto planetary disk didn't have so much accreted asteroids and comets proto Earth would not have gained so much water and would likely be dry.

If the Earth didn't accrete as much dust as it did, we'd have a smaller radius and likely not have a radioactive active core..the active core is what produces our magnetic field and thus protects us from the deadly solar wind of the sun. Life would not exist.

If the proto Earth had not been struck by another body just before 4.4 billion years ago, the planet would not have reconstituted into the present Earth 2 + moon system. Without the gyroscopic stabilization of the moon against the distant but influential gravitational nudges of Jupiter we'd have no predictable seasons and life would have no way for evolution to consistently emerge complex life forms...Earth would have stayed a planet of bacteria.

It goes on an on...if the Anoxic transition didn't occur, if the planet was not subject to the great extinction of 240~ Mya that cleared the landscape for the emergence of the dinosaurs...if the KT asteroid didn't hit 65 million years ago and clear the way for the rise of mammals and grasses and Magnoliaphylum...it goes on and on

Each one if it didn't occur would eliminate us from the rock...the Universe doesn't care about our presence here and the fact that we are finding so many worlds now, in so many states of pathology underscores this fact. Swollen giants mere millions of miles from their parents stars, Giants at impossible distances away from their stars and soon rocky planets in all states of formation thanks to Kepler Sat. If there is a God it surely lost track of our development in the endless list of billions upon billions of planets that exist in this Galaxy in various states of formation of life in a visible Universe of over 100 billion Galaxies...the mind simply boggles.

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