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A beautiful image of tendrils of epoxy extruded by capillary action by evaporation of a solvent to hug a polystyrene ball. The color was added after the fact by an artist, giving the tendrils a caressing finger like quality. Science and beauty together.


http://www.harvardscience.harvard.edu/engineering-technology/articles/researchers-control-assembly-nanobristles-helical-clusters

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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703481004574646402192953052.html

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